Crisis plural oxford

noun, plural cri·ses [krahy-seez]. a stage in a sequence of events at which the trend of all future events, especially for better or for worse, is determined; turning point. a condition of instability or danger, as in social, economic, political, or international affairs, leading to a decisive change.Aug 25, 2016 · 1. Life. John Stuart Mill was born on 20 May 1806 in Pentonville, then a northern suburb of London, to Harriet Barrow and James Mill. James Mill, a Scotsman, had been educated at Edinburgh University—taught by, amongst others, Dugald Stewart—and had moved to London in 1802, where he was to become a friend and prominent ally of Jeremy Bentham and the Philosophical Radicals. Curricula are the subjects in a course of study at a university or other institution.Curricula is the plural form of curriculum, the alternate plural form is curriculums.The adjective form is curricular.Curricula and curriculums are adapted from the Latin word, curriculum, meaning a running course, career. Latin words appropriated by the English language usually form their plurals by the ...crisis in British English (ˈkraɪsɪs ) noun Word forms: plural -ses (-siːz ) 1. a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something, esp in a sequence of events or a disease 2. an unstable period, esp one of extreme trouble or danger in politics, economics, etc 3. pathology a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a diseasenoun, plural emphases [ em-f uh-seez ] 1. special stress laid upon, or importance attached to, anything: The president's statement gave emphasis to the budgetary crisis. 2. something that is given great stress or importance: Morality was the emphasis of his speech. 3. Rhetoric. special and significant stress of voice laid on particular words or ...2 catastrophe, critical situation, deep water, dilemma, dire straits, disaster, emergency, exigency, extremity, meltdown (informal) mess, panic stations (informal) pass, plight, predicament, quandary, strait, trouble English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus crisiscri•sis. n., pl. -ses (-sēz). 1. a turning point, as in a sequence of events, for better or for worse. 2. a condition of instability, as in international relations, that leads to a decisive change. 3. a personal tragedy, emotional upheaval, or the like. 4.crisis noun [ C or U ] uk / ˈkraɪsɪs / us plural crises / ˈkraɪsiːz / a situation that is extremely difficult or dangerous, when there are many problems: a major / serious / global crisis an economic / financial / political crisis a looming/impending/growing crisis This matter needs to be discussed, in the light of the looming pensions crisis.colonized, adj. and n., sense B.1: “With the and plural agreement. People settled in a place as colonists, considered as a class. Obsolete. rare.” colonized, adj. and n., sense B.2: “With the and plural agreement: people subjected to colonial settlement and rule, considered as a class or group. Also (in quot. 1920) with singular…” noun plural noun crises /ˈkrʌɪsiːz/ 1 A time of intense difficulty or danger. 'the current economic crisis' More example sentences Synonyms A time when a difficult or important decision must be made. 'when the crisis came, she does not appear to have hesitated' More example sentences Synonymscrisis noun [ C or U ] uk / ˈkraɪsɪs / us plural crises / ˈkraɪsiːz / a situation that is extremely difficult or dangerous, when there are many problems: a major / serious / global crisis an economic / financial / political crisis a looming/impending/growing crisis This matter needs to be discussed, in the light of the looming pensions crisis.crisis From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English cri‧sis /ˈkraɪsɪs/ S3 W3 noun (plural crises /-siːz/) [ countable, uncountable] 1 a situation in which there are a lot of problems that must be dealt with quickly so that the situation does not get worse or more dangerous → emergency The country now faces an economic crisis.An Oxford comma is the final comma that can be used or omitted in a series. For example, consider the two following sentences: I like apples, oranges and pears. I like apples, oranges, and pears. The meaning of each sentence is the same, but the second one has an additional comma after oranges. That optional comma before the last item in the ...crisis From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English cri‧sis /ˈkraɪsɪs/ S3 W3 noun (plural crises /-siːz/) [ countable, uncountable] 1 a situation in which there are a lot of problems that must be dealt with quickly so that the situation does not get worse or more dangerous → emergency The country now faces an economic crisis.crisis in British English (ˈkraɪsɪs ) noun Word forms: plural -ses (-siːz ) 1. a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something, esp in a sequence of events or a disease 2. an unstable period, esp one of extreme trouble or danger in politics, economics, etc 3. pathology a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a diseasecrisis noun [ C or U ] uk / ˈkraɪsɪs / us plural crises / ˈkraɪsiːz / a situation that is extremely difficult or dangerous, when there are many problems: a major / serious / global crisis an economic / financial / political crisis a looming/impending/growing crisis This matter needs to be discussed, in the light of the looming pensions crisis.noun, plural cri·ses [krahy-seez]. a stage in a sequence of events at which the trend of all future events, especially for better or for worse, is determined; turning point. a condition of instability or danger, as in social, economic, political, or international affairs, leading to a decisive change.2 catastrophe, critical situation, deep water, dilemma, dire straits, disaster, emergency, exigency, extremity, meltdown (informal) mess, panic stations (informal) pass, plight, predicament, quandary, strait, trouble English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus crisisAn Oxford comma is the final comma that can be used or omitted in a series. For example, consider the two following sentences: I like apples, oranges and pears. I like apples, oranges, and pears. The meaning of each sentence is the same, but the second one has an additional comma after oranges. That optional comma before the last item in the ...What to Know. The three plurals for octopus come from the different ways the English language adopts plurals.Octopi is the oldest plural of octopus, coming from the belief that words of Latin origin should have Latin endings.Octopuses was the next plural, giving the word an English ending to match its adoption as an English word. Lastly, octopodes stemmed from the belief that because octopus ...noun, plural emphases [ em-f uh-seez ] 1. special stress laid upon, or importance attached to, anything: The president's statement gave emphasis to the budgetary crisis. 2. something that is given great stress or importance: Morality was the emphasis of his speech. 3. Rhetoric. special and significant stress of voice laid on particular words or ...noun, plural cri·ses [krahy-seez]. a stage in a sequence of events at which the trend of all future events, especially for better or for worse, is determined; turning point. a condition of instability or danger, as in social, economic, political, or international affairs, leading to a decisive change.noun, plural emphases [ em-f uh-seez ] 1. special stress laid upon, or importance attached to, anything: The president's statement gave emphasis to the budgetary crisis. 2. something that is given great stress or importance: Morality was the emphasis of his speech. 3. Rhetoric. special and significant stress of voice laid on particular words or ...noun, plural emphases [ em-f uh-seez ] 1. special stress laid upon, or importance attached to, anything: The president's statement gave emphasis to the budgetary crisis. 2. something that is given great stress or importance: Morality was the emphasis of his speech. 3. Rhetoric. special and significant stress of voice laid on particular words or ...The plural form “fruits” certainly exists. In its most traditional uses, it is not exactly “countable”, as it is used collectively or generally to refer to the products of something (either soil, or something more abstract). E.g., the Oxford English Dictionary gives the following quotations as examples for its first definition of ... crisis: [noun] the turning point for better or worse in an acute disease or fever. a paroxysmal attack of pain, distress, or disordered function. an emotionally significant event or radical change of status in a person's life.2 catastrophe, critical situation, deep water, dilemma, dire straits, disaster, emergency, exigency, extremity, meltdown (informal) mess, panic stations (informal) pass, plight, predicament, quandary, strait, trouble English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus crisiscrisis noun / ˈkraɪsəs / [countable, uncountable] (pl. crises / ˈkraɪsiz / ) a time of great danger, difficulty, or confusion when problems must be solved or important decisions must be made a political/financial crisis the government's latest economic crisis The business is still in crisis but it has survived the worst of the recession.Curricula are the subjects in a course of study at a university or other institution.Curricula is the plural form of curriculum, the alternate plural form is curriculums.The adjective form is curricular.Curricula and curriculums are adapted from the Latin word, curriculum, meaning a running course, career. Latin words appropriated by the English language usually form their plurals by the ...Answer The plural form of crisis is crises . Find more words! crisis Similar Words catastrophes disasters emergencies plights predicaments dilemmas messes trouble calamities extremities fiascos mires quagmires quandaries adversity cataclysms conundrums setbacks tragedy upheaval binds blows complication difficulty distress entanglement impassesDefinition of phenomenon noun in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more. Curricula are the subjects in a course of study at a university or other institution.Curricula is the plural form of curriculum, the alternate plural form is curriculums.The adjective form is curricular.Curricula and curriculums are adapted from the Latin word, curriculum, meaning a running course, career. Latin words appropriated by the English language usually form their plurals by the ...What to Know. The three plurals for octopus come from the different ways the English language adopts plurals.Octopi is the oldest plural of octopus, coming from the belief that words of Latin origin should have Latin endings.Octopuses was the next plural, giving the word an English ending to match its adoption as an English word. Lastly, octopodes stemmed from the belief that because octopus ...Aug 25, 2016 · 1. Life. John Stuart Mill was born on 20 May 1806 in Pentonville, then a northern suburb of London, to Harriet Barrow and James Mill. James Mill, a Scotsman, had been educated at Edinburgh University—taught by, amongst others, Dugald Stewart—and had moved to London in 1802, where he was to become a friend and prominent ally of Jeremy Bentham and the Philosophical Radicals. English nouns are inflected for grammatical number, meaning that, if they are of the countable type, they generally have different forms for singular and plural.This article discusses the variety of ways in which English plural nouns are formed from the corresponding singular forms, as well as various issues concerning the usage of singulars and plurals in English.crisis noun [ C or U ] uk / ˈkraɪsɪs / us plural crises / ˈkraɪsiːz / a situation that is extremely difficult or dangerous, when there are many problems: a major / serious / global crisis an economic / financial / political crisis a looming/impending/growing crisis This matter needs to be discussed, in the light of the looming pensions crisis.crisis noun [ C or U ] uk / ˈkraɪsɪs / us plural crises / ˈkraɪsiːz / a situation that is extremely difficult or dangerous, when there are many problems: a major / serious / global crisis an economic / financial / political crisis a looming/impending/growing crisis This matter needs to be discussed, in the light of the looming pensions crisis.Crises Is the Plural of Crisis The word crisis is defined as "a tragedy or negative event." A crisis can be political, social, financial, or even related to the weather or environment. That's why you might hear news about a mudslide, an economic collapse, or a riot described as a crisis.crisis in British English (ˈkraɪsɪs ) noun Word forms: plural -ses (-siːz ) 1. a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something, esp in a sequence of events or a disease 2. an unstable period, esp one of extreme trouble or danger in politics, economics, etc 3. pathology a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a diseaseThe city's fiscal crisis has deepened. In times of crisis it's good to have someone you can rely on for advice. She's no good in a crisis. The company is suffering a severe crisis of confidence. The government is in crisis. The plan could save the country from a looming energy crisis. Three people died during the hostage crisis. crisis noun [ C or U ] uk / ˈkraɪsɪs / us plural crises / ˈkraɪsiːz / a situation that is extremely difficult or dangerous, when there are many problems: a major / serious / global crisis an economic / financial / political crisis a looming/impending/growing crisis This matter needs to be discussed, in the light of the looming pensions crisis.colonized, adj. and n., sense B.1: “With the and plural agreement. People settled in a place as colonists, considered as a class. Obsolete. rare.” colonized, adj. and n., sense B.2: “With the and plural agreement: people subjected to colonial settlement and rule, considered as a class or group. Also (in quot. 1920) with singular…” cri•sis. n., pl. -ses (-sēz). 1. a turning point, as in a sequence of events, for better or for worse. 2. a condition of instability, as in international relations, that leads to a decisive change. 3. a personal tragedy, emotional upheaval, or the like. 4.English nouns are inflected for grammatical number, meaning that, if they are of the countable type, they generally have different forms for singular and plural.This article discusses the variety of ways in which English plural nouns are formed from the corresponding singular forms, as well as various issues concerning the usage of singulars and plurals in English.A notable exception to this is the word paparazzo, which keeps the Italian plural form paparazzi in English. There's also a group of Italian words which have entered English in their plural forms – these are typically the names for various kinds of pasta. For example: spaghetti; tagliatelle; tortellini; cannelloni; lasagne. 2 catastrophe, critical situation, deep water, dilemma, dire straits, disaster, emergency, exigency, extremity, meltdown (informal) mess, panic stations (informal) pass, plight, predicament, quandary, strait, trouble English Collins Dictionary - English synonyms & Thesaurus crisisnoun plural noun crises /ˈkrʌɪsiːz/ 1 A time of intense difficulty or danger. 'the current economic crisis' More example sentences Synonyms A time when a difficult or important decision must be made. 'when the crisis came, she does not appear to have hesitated' More example sentences Synonymscrisis From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English cri‧sis /ˈkraɪsɪs/ S3 W3 noun (plural crises /-siːz/) [ countable, uncountable] 1 a situation in which there are a lot of problems that must be dealt with quickly so that the situation does not get worse or more dangerous → emergency The country now faces an economic crisis.noun, plural emphases [ em-f uh-seez ] 1. special stress laid upon, or importance attached to, anything: The president's statement gave emphasis to the budgetary crisis. 2. something that is given great stress or importance: Morality was the emphasis of his speech. 3. Rhetoric. special and significant stress of voice laid on particular words or ...The plural form “fruits” certainly exists. In its most traditional uses, it is not exactly “countable”, as it is used collectively or generally to refer to the products of something (either soil, or something more abstract). E.g., the Oxford English Dictionary gives the following quotations as examples for its first definition of ... English nouns are inflected for grammatical number, meaning that, if they are of the countable type, they generally have different forms for singular and plural.This article discusses the variety of ways in which English plural nouns are formed from the corresponding singular forms, as well as various issues concerning the usage of singulars and plurals in English.noun critical situation synonyms for crisis Compare Synonyms catastrophe change confrontation crunch deadlock dilemma disaster emergency impasse mess pressure situation trouble climacteric climax contingency corner crossroad crux culmination embarrassment entanglement exigency extremity height imbroglio juncture necessity pass perplexity pickleEnglish nouns are inflected for grammatical number, meaning that, if they are of the countable type, they generally have different forms for singular and plural.This article discusses the variety of ways in which English plural nouns are formed from the corresponding singular forms, as well as various issues concerning the usage of singulars and plurals in English.crisis noun / ˈkraɪsəs / [countable, uncountable] (pl. crises / ˈkraɪsiz / ) a time of great danger, difficulty, or confusion when problems must be solved or important decisions must be made a political/financial crisis the government's latest economic crisis The business is still in crisis but it has survived the worst of the recession.crisis From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English cri‧sis /ˈkraɪsɪs/ S3 W3 noun (plural crises /-siːz/) [ countable, uncountable] 1 a situation in which there are a lot of problems that must be dealt with quickly so that the situation does not get worse or more dangerous → emergency The country now faces an economic crisis.cri•sis. n., pl. -ses (-sēz). 1. a turning point, as in a sequence of events, for better or for worse. 2. a condition of instability, as in international relations, that leads to a decisive change. 3. a personal tragedy, emotional upheaval, or the like. 4.Definition of phenomenon noun in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more. Answer The plural form of crisis is crises . Find more words! crisis Similar Words catastrophes disasters emergencies plights predicaments dilemmas messes trouble calamities extremities fiascos mires quagmires quandaries adversity cataclysms conundrums setbacks tragedy upheaval binds blows complication difficulty distress entanglement impassesAnswer The plural form of crisis is crises . Find more words! crisis Similar Words catastrophes disasters emergencies plights predicaments dilemmas messes trouble calamities extremities fiascos mires quagmires quandaries adversity cataclysms conundrums setbacks tragedy upheaval binds blows complication difficulty distress entanglement impassesnoun, plural emphases [ em-f uh-seez ] 1. special stress laid upon, or importance attached to, anything: The president's statement gave emphasis to the budgetary crisis. 2. something that is given great stress or importance: Morality was the emphasis of his speech. 3. Rhetoric. special and significant stress of voice laid on particular words or ...Definition of phenomenon noun in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more. The city's fiscal crisis has deepened. In times of crisis it's good to have someone you can rely on for advice. She's no good in a crisis. The company is suffering a severe crisis of confidence. The government is in crisis. The plan could save the country from a looming energy crisis. Three people died during the hostage crisis. Krass Word forms plural crises krasiz variable noun A crisis is each situation at which disease or will is affected by figure or explore very serious problems. Irregular nouns are those that do not...crisis noun / ˈkraɪsəs / [countable, uncountable] (pl. crises / ˈkraɪsiz / ) a time of great danger, difficulty, or confusion when problems must be solved or important decisions must be made a political/financial crisis the government's latest economic crisis The business is still in crisis but it has survived the worst of the recession.Crises Is the Plural of Crisis The word crisis is defined as "a tragedy or negative event." A crisis can be political, social, financial, or even related to the weather or environment. That's why you might hear news about a mudslide, an economic collapse, or a riot described as a crisis.Crise definition, crisis. See more. His first definite success was gained in the year 1852, when he published the novel Bellah and produced the comedy La Crise.Answer The plural form of crisis is crises . Find more words! crisis Similar Words catastrophes disasters emergencies plights predicaments dilemmas messes trouble calamities extremities fiascos mires quagmires quandaries adversity cataclysms conundrums setbacks tragedy upheaval binds blows complication difficulty distress entanglement impassesWe might wish to reflect on the exact ways in which the personal voice is nested within the collective and the plural in moments of crisis; the ways in which archival cultures, archive fevers, and archive troubles come, at moments of crisis, to safeguard and validate the singular as a means to talk about the plural. ... Oxford: Oxford ...noun critical situation synonyms for crisis Compare Synonyms catastrophe change confrontation crunch deadlock dilemma disaster emergency impasse mess pressure situation trouble climacteric climax contingency corner crossroad crux culmination embarrassment entanglement exigency extremity height imbroglio juncture necessity pass perplexity pickleSep 04, 2018 · The New Oxford Dictionary of English (1998) not only accepts singular they, they also use the form in their definitions. And the New Oxford American Dictionary (Third Edition, 2010), calls singular they ‘generally accepted’ with indefinites, and ‘now common but less widely accepted’ with definite nouns, especially in formal contexts. A crisis (plural: "crises"; adjectival form: "critical") is any event or period that will lead or may lead to an unstable and dangerous situation affecting an individual, group, or all of society.Crises are negative changes in the human or environmental affairs, especially when they occur abruptly, with little or no warning. More loosely, a crisis is a testing time for an emergency.plural of crisis. Crisis noun. An unstable situation, in political, social, economic or military affairs, especially one involving an impending abrupt change. Crisis noun. A sudden change in the course of a disease, usually at which point the patient is expected to either recover or die. Crisis noun. (psychology) A traumatic or stressful change ...(plural crises /ˈkraɪsiːz/ /ˈkraɪsiːz/ ) a time of great danger, difficulty or doubt when problems must be solved or important decisions must be made an economic/a financial crisis The government is attempting to solve the debt crisis through spending cuts. The government is facing a political crisis.Irregular Nouns With New Meanings "When a word with an irregular plural is given a new meaning, it often takes a regular plural. So, although leaves is the usual plural of leaf, the Toronto hockey team is called the Maple Leafs, a tea in Taiwan is called Leafs and a Swedish band is called Fallen Leafs.The normal regular plural for mouse must be mice, yet computer mice gives a strange image of ...Answer The plural form of crisis is crises . Find more words! crisis Similar Words catastrophes disasters emergencies plights predicaments dilemmas messes trouble calamities extremities fiascos mires quagmires quandaries adversity cataclysms conundrums setbacks tragedy upheaval binds blows complication difficulty distress entanglement impassesAug 25, 2016 · 1. Life. John Stuart Mill was born on 20 May 1806 in Pentonville, then a northern suburb of London, to Harriet Barrow and James Mill. James Mill, a Scotsman, had been educated at Edinburgh University—taught by, amongst others, Dugald Stewart—and had moved to London in 1802, where he was to become a friend and prominent ally of Jeremy Bentham and the Philosophical Radicals. plural of crisis. Crisis noun. An unstable situation, in political, social, economic or military affairs, especially one involving an impending abrupt change. Crisis noun. A sudden change in the course of a disease, usually at which point the patient is expected to either recover or die. Crisis noun. (psychology) A traumatic or stressful change ...crisis From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English cri‧sis /ˈkraɪsɪs/ S3 W3 noun (plural crises /-siːz/) [ countable, uncountable] 1 a situation in which there are a lot of problems that must be dealt with quickly so that the situation does not get worse or more dangerous → emergency The country now faces an economic crisis.Answer The plural form of crisis is crises . Find more words! crisis Similar Words catastrophes disasters emergencies plights predicaments dilemmas messes trouble calamities extremities fiascos mires quagmires quandaries adversity cataclysms conundrums setbacks tragedy upheaval binds blows complication difficulty distress entanglement impassesWhat to Know. The three plurals for octopus come from the different ways the English language adopts plurals.Octopi is the oldest plural of octopus, coming from the belief that words of Latin origin should have Latin endings.Octopuses was the next plural, giving the word an English ending to match its adoption as an English word. Lastly, octopodes stemmed from the belief that because octopus ...(plural crises /ˈkraɪsiːz/ /ˈkraɪsiːz/ ) a time of great danger, difficulty or doubt when problems must be solved or important decisions must be made an economic/a financial crisis The government is attempting to solve the debt crisis through spending cuts. The government is facing a political crisis.crisis in British English (ˈkraɪsɪs ) noun Word forms: plural -ses (-siːz ) 1. a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something, esp in a sequence of events or a disease 2. an unstable period, esp one of extreme trouble or danger in politics, economics, etc 3. pathology a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a diseasecrisis: [noun] the turning point for better or worse in an acute disease or fever. a paroxysmal attack of pain, distress, or disordered function. an emotionally significant event or radical change of status in a person's life.An Oxford comma is the final comma that can be used or omitted in a series. For example, consider the two following sentences: I like apples, oranges and pears. I like apples, oranges, and pears. The meaning of each sentence is the same, but the second one has an additional comma after oranges. That optional comma before the last item in the ...crisis From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English cri‧sis /ˈkraɪsɪs/ S3 W3 noun (plural crises /-siːz/) [ countable, uncountable] 1 a situation in which there are a lot of problems that must be dealt with quickly so that the situation does not get worse or more dangerous → emergency The country now faces an economic crisis.We might wish to reflect on the exact ways in which the personal voice is nested within the collective and the plural in moments of crisis; the ways in which archival cultures, archive fevers, and archive troubles come, at moments of crisis, to safeguard and validate the singular as a means to talk about the plural. ... Oxford: Oxford ...Curricula are the subjects in a course of study at a university or other institution.Curricula is the plural form of curriculum, the alternate plural form is curriculums.The adjective form is curricular.Curricula and curriculums are adapted from the Latin word, curriculum, meaning a running course, career. Latin words appropriated by the English language usually form their plurals by the ...An Oxford comma is the final comma that can be used or omitted in a series. For example, consider the two following sentences: I like apples, oranges and pears. I like apples, oranges, and pears. The meaning of each sentence is the same, but the second one has an additional comma after oranges. That optional comma before the last item in the ...crisis noun [ C or U ] uk / ˈkraɪsɪs / us plural crises / ˈkraɪsiːz / a situation that is extremely difficult or dangerous, when there are many problems: a major / serious / global crisis an economic / financial / political crisis a looming/impending/growing crisis This matter needs to be discussed, in the light of the looming pensions crisis.noun plural noun crises /ˈkrʌɪsiːz/ 1 A time of intense difficulty or danger. 'the current economic crisis' More example sentences Synonyms A time when a difficult or important decision must be made. 'when the crisis came, she does not appear to have hesitated' More example sentences SynonymsDefinition of phenomenon noun in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more. noun critical situation synonyms for crisis Compare Synonyms catastrophe change confrontation crunch deadlock dilemma disaster emergency impasse mess pressure situation trouble climacteric climax contingency corner crossroad crux culmination embarrassment entanglement exigency extremity height imbroglio juncture necessity pass perplexity pickleWe might wish to reflect on the exact ways in which the personal voice is nested within the collective and the plural in moments of crisis; the ways in which archival cultures, archive fevers, and archive troubles come, at moments of crisis, to safeguard and validate the singular as a means to talk about the plural. ... Oxford: Oxford ...Irregular Nouns With New Meanings "When a word with an irregular plural is given a new meaning, it often takes a regular plural. So, although leaves is the usual plural of leaf, the Toronto hockey team is called the Maple Leafs, a tea in Taiwan is called Leafs and a Swedish band is called Fallen Leafs.The normal regular plural for mouse must be mice, yet computer mice gives a strange image of ...crisis From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English cri‧sis /ˈkraɪsɪs/ S3 W3 noun (plural crises /-siːz/) [ countable, uncountable] 1 a situation in which there are a lot of problems that must be dealt with quickly so that the situation does not get worse or more dangerous → emergency The country now faces an economic crisis.Curricula are the subjects in a course of study at a university or other institution.Curricula is the plural form of curriculum, the alternate plural form is curriculums.The adjective form is curricular.Curricula and curriculums are adapted from the Latin word, curriculum, meaning a running course, career. Latin words appropriated by the English language usually form their plurals by the ...Aug 25, 2016 · 1. Life. John Stuart Mill was born on 20 May 1806 in Pentonville, then a northern suburb of London, to Harriet Barrow and James Mill. James Mill, a Scotsman, had been educated at Edinburgh University—taught by, amongst others, Dugald Stewart—and had moved to London in 1802, where he was to become a friend and prominent ally of Jeremy Bentham and the Philosophical Radicals. crisis in British English (ˈkraɪsɪs ) noun Word forms: plural -ses (-siːz ) 1. a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something, esp in a sequence of events or a disease 2. an unstable period, esp one of extreme trouble or danger in politics, economics, etc 3. pathology a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a diseaseCrises Is the Plural of Crisis The word crisis is defined as "a tragedy or negative event." A crisis can be political, social, financial, or even related to the weather or environment. That's why you might hear news about a mudslide, an economic collapse, or a riot described as a crisis.noun plural noun crises /ˈkrʌɪsiːz/ 1 A time of intense difficulty or danger. 'the current economic crisis' More example sentences Synonyms A time when a difficult or important decision must be made. 'when the crisis came, she does not appear to have hesitated' More example sentences Synonymsplural of crisis. Crisis noun. An unstable situation, in political, social, economic or military affairs, especially one involving an impending abrupt change. Crisis noun. A sudden change in the course of a disease, usually at which point the patient is expected to either recover or die. Crisis noun. (psychology) A traumatic or stressful change ...crisis: [noun] the turning point for better or worse in an acute disease or fever. a paroxysmal attack of pain, distress, or disordered function. an emotionally significant event or radical change of status in a person's life.A notable exception to this is the word paparazzo, which keeps the Italian plural form paparazzi in English. There's also a group of Italian words which have entered English in their plural forms – these are typically the names for various kinds of pasta. For example: spaghetti; tagliatelle; tortellini; cannelloni; lasagne. noun plural noun crises /ˈkrʌɪsiːz/ 1 A time of intense difficulty or danger. 'the current economic crisis' More example sentences Synonyms A time when a difficult or important decision must be made. 'when the crisis came, she does not appear to have hesitated' More example sentences SynonymsKrass Word forms plural crises krasiz variable noun A crisis is each situation at which disease or will is affected by figure or explore very serious problems. Irregular nouns are those that do not...Aug 25, 2016 · 1. Life. John Stuart Mill was born on 20 May 1806 in Pentonville, then a northern suburb of London, to Harriet Barrow and James Mill. James Mill, a Scotsman, had been educated at Edinburgh University—taught by, amongst others, Dugald Stewart—and had moved to London in 1802, where he was to become a friend and prominent ally of Jeremy Bentham and the Philosophical Radicals. An Oxford comma is the final comma that can be used or omitted in a series. For example, consider the two following sentences: I like apples, oranges and pears. I like apples, oranges, and pears. The meaning of each sentence is the same, but the second one has an additional comma after oranges. That optional comma before the last item in the ...noun plural noun crises /ˈkrʌɪsiːz/ 1 A time of intense difficulty or danger. 'the current economic crisis' More example sentences Synonyms A time when a difficult or important decision must be made. 'when the crisis came, she does not appear to have hesitated' More example sentences SynonymsCrise definition, crisis. See more. His first definite success was gained in the year 1852, when he published the novel Bellah and produced the comedy La Crise.crisis noun / ˈkraɪsəs / [countable, uncountable] (pl. crises / ˈkraɪsiz / ) a time of great danger, difficulty, or confusion when problems must be solved or important decisions must be made a political/financial crisis the government's latest economic crisis The business is still in crisis but it has survived the worst of the recession.What to Know. The three plurals for octopus come from the different ways the English language adopts plurals.Octopi is the oldest plural of octopus, coming from the belief that words of Latin origin should have Latin endings.Octopuses was the next plural, giving the word an English ending to match its adoption as an English word. Lastly, octopodes stemmed from the belief that because octopus ...Aug 25, 2016 · 1. Life. John Stuart Mill was born on 20 May 1806 in Pentonville, then a northern suburb of London, to Harriet Barrow and James Mill. James Mill, a Scotsman, had been educated at Edinburgh University—taught by, amongst others, Dugald Stewart—and had moved to London in 1802, where he was to become a friend and prominent ally of Jeremy Bentham and the Philosophical Radicals. noun, plural cri·ses [krahy-seez]. a stage in a sequence of events at which the trend of all future events, especially for better or for worse, is determined; turning point. a condition of instability or danger, as in social, economic, political, or international affairs, leading to a decisive change.Crise definition, crisis. See more. His first definite success was gained in the year 1852, when he published the novel Bellah and produced the comedy La Crise.The city's fiscal crisis has deepened. In times of crisis it's good to have someone you can rely on for advice. She's no good in a crisis. The company is suffering a severe crisis of confidence. The government is in crisis. The plan could save the country from a looming energy crisis. Three people died during the hostage crisis. roof. The standard plural form in BrE is roofs, but there is an occasional, and recognized, minority form rooves, which will disturb many people. It is a classic example of a disputed plural, something that was brought out by a correspondent to ... ... Access to the complete content on Oxford Reference requires a subscription or purchase.noun critical situation synonyms for crisis Compare Synonyms catastrophe change confrontation crunch deadlock dilemma disaster emergency impasse mess pressure situation trouble climacteric climax contingency corner crossroad crux culmination embarrassment entanglement exigency extremity height imbroglio juncture necessity pass perplexity pickleThe plural form “fruits” certainly exists. In its most traditional uses, it is not exactly “countable”, as it is used collectively or generally to refer to the products of something (either soil, or something more abstract). E.g., the Oxford English Dictionary gives the following quotations as examples for its first definition of ... A crisis (plural: "crises"; adjectival form: "critical") is any event or period that will lead or may lead to an unstable and dangerous situation affecting an individual, group, or all of society.Crises are negative changes in the human or environmental affairs, especially when they occur abruptly, with little or no warning. More loosely, a crisis is a testing time for an emergency.A notable exception to this is the word paparazzo, which keeps the Italian plural form paparazzi in English. There's also a group of Italian words which have entered English in their plural forms – these are typically the names for various kinds of pasta. For example: spaghetti; tagliatelle; tortellini; cannelloni; lasagne. Irregular Nouns With New Meanings "When a word with an irregular plural is given a new meaning, it often takes a regular plural. So, although leaves is the usual plural of leaf, the Toronto hockey team is called the Maple Leafs, a tea in Taiwan is called Leafs and a Swedish band is called Fallen Leafs.The normal regular plural for mouse must be mice, yet computer mice gives a strange image of ...An Oxford comma is the final comma that can be used or omitted in a series. For example, consider the two following sentences: I like apples, oranges and pears. I like apples, oranges, and pears. The meaning of each sentence is the same, but the second one has an additional comma after oranges. That optional comma before the last item in the ...crisis in British English (ˈkraɪsɪs ) noun Word forms: plural -ses (-siːz ) 1. a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something, esp in a sequence of events or a disease 2. an unstable period, esp one of extreme trouble or danger in politics, economics, etc 3. pathology a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a diseaseThe city's fiscal crisis has deepened. In times of crisis it's good to have someone you can rely on for advice. She's no good in a crisis. The company is suffering a severe crisis of confidence. The government is in crisis. The plan could save the country from a looming energy crisis. Three people died during the hostage crisis. Krass Word forms plural crises krasiz variable noun A crisis is each situation at which disease or will is affected by figure or explore very serious problems. Irregular nouns are those that do not...What to Know. The three plurals for octopus come from the different ways the English language adopts plurals.Octopi is the oldest plural of octopus, coming from the belief that words of Latin origin should have Latin endings.Octopuses was the next plural, giving the word an English ending to match its adoption as an English word. Lastly, octopodes stemmed from the belief that because octopus ...crisis From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English cri‧sis /ˈkraɪsɪs/ S3 W3 noun (plural crises /-siːz/) [ countable, uncountable] 1 a situation in which there are a lot of problems that must be dealt with quickly so that the situation does not get worse or more dangerous → emergency The country now faces an economic crisis.colonized, adj. and n., sense B.1: “With the and plural agreement. People settled in a place as colonists, considered as a class. Obsolete. rare.” colonized, adj. and n., sense B.2: “With the and plural agreement: people subjected to colonial settlement and rule, considered as a class or group. Also (in quot. 1920) with singular…” noun plural noun crises /ˈkrʌɪsiːz/ 1 A time of intense difficulty or danger. 'the current economic crisis' More example sentences Synonyms A time when a difficult or important decision must be made. 'when the crisis came, she does not appear to have hesitated' More example sentences SynonymsWe might wish to reflect on the exact ways in which the personal voice is nested within the collective and the plural in moments of crisis; the ways in which archival cultures, archive fevers, and archive troubles come, at moments of crisis, to safeguard and validate the singular as a means to talk about the plural. ... Oxford: Oxford ...cri•sis. n., pl. -ses (-sēz). 1. a turning point, as in a sequence of events, for better or for worse. 2. a condition of instability, as in international relations, that leads to a decisive change. 3. a personal tragedy, emotional upheaval, or the like. 4.A crisis (plural: "crises"; adjectival form: "critical") is any event or period that will lead or may lead to an unstable and dangerous situation affecting an individual, group, or all of society.Crises are negative changes in the human or environmental affairs, especially when they occur abruptly, with little or no warning. More loosely, a crisis is a testing time for an emergency.noun critical situation synonyms for crisis Compare Synonyms catastrophe change confrontation crunch deadlock dilemma disaster emergency impasse mess pressure situation trouble climacteric climax contingency corner crossroad crux culmination embarrassment entanglement exigency extremity height imbroglio juncture necessity pass perplexity pickleroof. The standard plural form in BrE is roofs, but there is an occasional, and recognized, minority form rooves, which will disturb many people. It is a classic example of a disputed plural, something that was brought out by a correspondent to ... ... Access to the complete content on Oxford Reference requires a subscription or purchase.A crisis (plural: "crises"; adjectival form: "critical") is any event or period that will lead or may lead to an unstable and dangerous situation affecting an individual, group, or all of society.Crises are negative changes in the human or environmental affairs, especially when they occur abruptly, with little or no warning. More loosely, a crisis is a testing time for an emergency.An Oxford comma is the final comma that can be used or omitted in a series. For example, consider the two following sentences: I like apples, oranges and pears. I like apples, oranges, and pears. The meaning of each sentence is the same, but the second one has an additional comma after oranges. That optional comma before the last item in the ...(plural crises /ˈkraɪsiːz/ /ˈkraɪsiːz/ ) a time of great danger, difficulty or doubt when problems must be solved or important decisions must be made an economic/a financial crisis The government is attempting to solve the debt crisis through spending cuts. The government is facing a political crisis.Krass Word forms plural crises krasiz variable noun A crisis is each situation at which disease or will is affected by figure or explore very serious problems. Irregular nouns are those that do not...crisis in British English (ˈkraɪsɪs ) noun Word forms: plural -ses (-siːz ) 1. a crucial stage or turning point in the course of something, esp in a sequence of events or a disease 2. an unstable period, esp one of extreme trouble or danger in politics, economics, etc 3. pathology a sudden change, for better or worse, in the course of a diseasecrisis: [noun] the turning point for better or worse in an acute disease or fever. a paroxysmal attack of pain, distress, or disordered function. an emotionally significant event or radical change of status in a person's life.The city's fiscal crisis has deepened. In times of crisis it's good to have someone you can rely on for advice. She's no good in a crisis. The company is suffering a severe crisis of confidence. The government is in crisis. The plan could save the country from a looming energy crisis. Three people died during the hostage crisis. ost_kttl